11 Best Nuts for Nut Flour

If you have just gotten to know the benefits of nut flour and all the good it can do for your body and in your kitchen, you will probably be very excited to start making some for yourself. You could buy it pre-made, yes, but if you are an avid baker who will need bulk amounts of flour, or someone who would just like to make larger amounts for whenever they may need it, buying nuts in bulk and making the nut flour yourself with a food processor is the most cost-effective way to go.

However, if you are new to the world of nut flour, it can be quite daunting to get started. There is an absolutely huge volume of information out there, and often what one source says will contradict what you have already read from another, equally credible source. Even things as simple as what bulk stores have the best prices for their nuts, which food processor you should use, or what kind of recipes nut flour works best in. It is very easy to get discouraged when the sheer volume for information out there is just so vast.

Unfortunately, I cannot help you find the exact right information for you, your diet, your kitchen, and your wallet. Those things all depend on a huge variety of factors that you will need to examine before deciding them yourself. It can be a long process, but the results when you have everything just right in your kitchen is so, so worth it. However, one thing I can do is help to show you your options. If you are just starting to integrate nut flours into your cooking, the biggest and most obvious question is almost certainly: “What kind of nuts should I be using”?

Just like there are many different food processors, and many different places to buy your nuts from, there are many different kinds of nuts that can all be used for nut flours. Each of these nuts imparts a different taste, color, and constitution to whatever you choose to use it in, so selecting the right nut for whatever dish you are trying to make is an important decision to make. Your choices will also be limited depending on where you live in the world, which will impact what kind of nuts are readily available to you locally, and also what season it currently is. Unless you are okay with ordering your nuts online, those two factors: location, and season, will greatly impact what options you have when it comes to creating your nut flour.  If you are feeling up to its great to make flour and nut butter in the say cooking session here is a my article on nut butter.

So today, we are going to be examining a total of 11 delicious options that you should consider when selecting what to use for your nut flour. Of course, I recommend buying a few different nuts you enjoy or are interested in, so what you can experiment to find exactly what is right for you. These nuts range from the commonplace to the most exotic, and everything in between! However, all of them are tasty, healthy options that will give you much more nutrients than traditional processed flour, which has most of its nutrients stripped out during the bleaching process. By making sure you get many of those essential nutrients you would otherwise be missing you on, you are making sure that you make the most out of the calories you consume. So, let’s take a look at 11 of our best options to make nut flour!  After you check the list and pick the nut you want to use then click here to pick the best processor for your nut flour.  

Almonds

The most common nut for nut flour, almonds provide an amazing, delicate flavor that is not overpowering. You will be able to find them in almost any store that sells nuts in bulk, and regardless of the season, you should be able to get them at a very cheap price. If you are looking for a nut to use, this is a very solid option.

Cashews

These can be a little more expensive than most options, especially if you opt to buy them organic, but the taste of these amazing nuts makes it worth the price tag to many people. They provide a delicious and strong, but not overpowering, nutty taste in the flour. They also tend to provide a lighter-colored flour, perfect if you are looking to make something a lighter color.

Macadamia Nuts

Also known as a “Queensland Nut” or “Australian Nut”, these nuts impart a rich, delicious flavor that almost tastes buttery. If you are planning to make pastries, or any other dish that could benefit from having a little hint of butter in it, these nuts are a fantastic choice. This also helps you to use less butter, since you will not need to use as much of the real thing to impart the same amazing taste.

Hazelnuts

Well-known for their flavor, these nuts are a solid option for chocolate-flavored dishes, or for anyone craving something rich and sweet in their cooking.

Brazil Nuts

You might find these under the names “Paranut” or “Cream Nut”, these large, elongated nuts provide a huge does of antioxidants and vitamins, while still imparting a great nutty flavor to your flour.

Peanuts

Classic and traditional, you cannot go wrong with peanuts. They are cheap and provide their iconic flavor to any nut flour you use them in.

Walnuts

More on the expensive side, these nuts are one of the most popular ingredients in baking as it is, and you will often be able to find them still in the shell at your local grocery store.

Pistachios

While most of the pistachios you will find are the Californian variety, you will want to look out for the Turkish or Persian variety, which are smaller, darker and much more dense in flavor. A real treat!

Pine Nuts

Small and delicious, these nuts are tiny and pale, but still impart an amazing flavor to your flour. You will want to look for Chinese pine nuts, as there are larger and harder than their Italian counterparts, making them easier to grind.

Pecans

Very popular nuts, these are sweet and delicious. These can create darker, more rich flours that you can use for any variety of sweet pastries.

Marcona Almonds

These are flatter and far, far sweeter than regular almonds. Using these instead of their standard counterparts, these are perfect if you have a sweet tooth and do not want to indulge in processed sugar!

 

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